Provand’s Lordship Glasgow

Are you a lover of History? Or do you find yourself fascinated by discovering the oldest possible parts of Glasgow? Well then, look no further than Provand’s Lordship. Located just a few minutes walk, and across the road from Glasgow Cathedral. This fascinating building is one of the two oldest standing houses in the city, although, at one point this house would have been one of the hundreds in that area. The house itself was built in 1471 by Andrew Muirhead, who was the bishop of Glasgow. It is though that, the building was part of a hospital that stood on the site.

Where can I find Provand's Lordship in Glasgow?

Step back into medieval Glasgow with a visit to this fascinating building with its range of 17th furniture and portraits.

Throughout its long and fascinating history, the building has experienced an interesting life. In the 1900s, when the Provand’s Lordship was forming with the aim of saving the building, it was occupied by the Morton family who ran a sweet shop from the building; this survived until after the first world war. At the moment, the building operates as a museum and admission are currently free. Inside, you can find amazing displays on each of the three main stories. These displays explain the history of the house and medieval Glasgow as a whole. So, what are you waiting for? Come and see one of the oldest houses in Glasgow and step back in time to experience the fascinating history of the area!

  • Provand’s Lordship was built in 1471
  • One of only four surviving medieval buildings in Glasgow
  • Close to St Mungo’s Cathedral
  • admission is free

Things to do near Glasgow

0 miles

St Mungo Museum of Religious Life and Art

Do you love history? Then make your way down to the St Mungo Museum of Religious life and art. This museum is steeped in the fascinating history of this beautiful city. Named after the patron saint ...
0 miles

Sightseeing at Glasgow Cathedral

Arguably one of the most important buildings in Scotland and conveniently nestled into the city centre. This miraculous structure has an impressive past, most of which is easily visible inside and outside of the cathedral. It ...
0 miles

Necropolis Tours in Glasgow

Take a spooky tour through the magnificent site of Glasgow Necropolis! The Friends Of Glasgow Necropolis are excited to offer friendly and educational walking tours of the Glasgow Necropolis. The tours are run by extremely well ...
0 miles

Enjoy Afternoon Tea on the Red Bus Bistro

For those interesting in undertaking a slightly different kind of bus tour around Glasgow, The Red Bus Bistro is a cafe on wheels! Providing afternoon tea, sandwiches, coffee, and pastries, all while taking a detailed tour ...
0 miles

Brewery Tour at Tennents Brewery

Love beer? Then why not make your way down to Glasgow’s own Tennents Brewery! Officially known as Wellpark brewery. This famous old brewery has been engrained in Glasgow’s psyche and culture since 1556, So this tour ...
0 miles

The Glasgow Police Museum

For an interesting day out! Have you ever wanted to learn about the history of our Police force here in Scotland? Well then, the Glasgow Police Museum is the place for you! The Museum is run ...
0 miles

Clyde River Cycle Tour in Glasgow

For those planning on visiting Scotland’s largest city! Are you seeking a day out that will inform and educate you, but also be highly unique? If so, the Clyde River Cycle Tour in Glasgow is the ...
0 miles

The Underground – LGBTQ Nightclub in the centre of Glasgow!

One of Glasgow’s friendliest gay bars, The Underground is a popular draw for locals and tourists looking to make friends and drink refreshing, cheap beverages in a colourful atmosphere. Features a free jukebox which you can choose ...
0 miles

Tolbooth Steeple in Glasgow

Calling all history lovers! Do you want to explore this history of Scotland’s largest city? Thankfully, Glasgow still has a strong resemblance to its past with regard to its buildings. The Tolbooth Steeple is the perfect ...
0 miles

The Barrowlands Weekend Market in Glasgow

For lovers of history and bargains! One of the most fascinating things to do on your trip to Glasgow is attending the Barrowlands Weekend Market, more commonly referred to as the Barras. This area is also ...
1 mile

Walking tours in Glasgow City Centre

Come take a stroll around Scotland’s largest city and stand in the streets steeped in history. This tour takes patrons around Glasgow city centre stopping off at different sites and giving a detailed history of the ...
1 mile

Ghost Tour Exploration Game in Glasgow

Edinburgh is world-famous for its Ghost tours, but Glasgow can also rival its neighbour city in this field. Discover the hidden treasures in the city, while also playing an interesting game. This ghost tour provides patrons ...
ref:20

What's on in Glasgow

Piping Live! Glasgow International Piping Festival

13 - 14 August, 2022
A week-long celebration of piping, including contemporary and traditional, solo and pipe bands. The World Pipe Band Championships take place on the second to last day at Glasgow Green, with free family displays in George Square.

Curious About Glasgow

13 - 26 August, 2022
Explore Glasgow with these two self-guided walks. If you're feeling up to it, you can also include a treasure hunt for added fun.

Dandelion -- Unexpected Garden: Govan

13 - 26 August, 2022
28 April-11 September Govan’s Unexpected Garden transforms a former timber storage facility, backing onto the Fairley Street workshop of GalGael. At the heart of the garden is The Govan Dozen; thirteen timber posts in a henge that create space for fires and feasts. There’s an upcycled and upturned wooden boat transformed into a welfare cabin and tool shed. An outdoor kitchen will support the rediscovery of traditional preserving techniques and explore the creation of herbal remedies. In these social spaces, neighbours and visitors alike can come together and enjoy the things that matter most in life: food, and good company. GalGael are a community who work together on demanding common tasks and stand in solidarity with those experiencing the profoundest effects of wealth inequality. Together, they’ll be digging alongside Tenement Veg, a working co-operative based in Glasgow’s Southside that grows and shares vegetables within communities. Their garden will cultivate local resilience in ways that are both regenerative and restorative for individuals and the wider community. GalGael's Unexpected Garden will be closed on Rangers Home Game Match days and at times when Orange Walks are scheduled.

Domestic Bliss

12 - 25 August, 2022
Featuring Jane Evelyn Atwood, Chris Bramble, Rabiya Choudhry, Thomas J Clapperton, Emmanuel Cooper, Anne Collier, Kate Davis, Jacqueline Donachie, The Empire Cafe, Alasdair Gray, Ilana Halperin, Jessie M King, Nicola L, Oscar Marzaroli, Mandy McIntosh and the Feegie Needlers, Scott Myles, Grayson Perry, Niki de Saint Phalle, Walter Price, Jo Spence, Ettore Sottsass, Joel Sternfeld, Camara Taylor, Jane Topping, Hanneline Visnes, Nick Waplington, Daphne Wright. Domestic Bliss presents works from Glasgow Museums’ collection reflecting on the Gallery of Modern Art's history; as a former house, a Royal Exchange and civic space.  Observing how artists work with fine art, design and craft practices alongside social and political changes, this show explores domestic labour and feminism, public and private space, intimate relationships and historical narratives. We live in a consumerist world where home interior, lifestyle magazines and social media present flawless examples for us to emulate in our own lives. What happens if we question what is seen as ‘domestic bliss’, and whose stories are hidden or revealed? Image: Domestic Bliss (2019). Photo: Ruth Clark 

Taste!

12 - 25 August, 2022
Featuring Aaron Angell, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Beryl Cook, Fischli/Weiss, Sarah Forrest, Andy Goldsworthy, Ian Hamilton Finlay, Sharon Hayes, David Hockney, Eduardo Paolozzi, David Shrigley, Stanley Spencer, Andy Warhol, Lawrence Weiner Taste! is an exhibition of artworks from Glasgow Museums’ collection displayed alongside material from the Gallery of Modern Art (GoMA) archive. Through the display of artwork and archive it explores how collections are built, artworks are commissioned, and exhibitions are organised. Taste! presents a narrative that unpicks the history of the GoMA collecting, shining a light on both the artworks and the processes behind their journey from artist’s studio to museum collection. By hanging artwork and archive together, Taste! suggests that object and idea are of equal importance and offers the exhibition as a space to enjoy, question and discuss the value of art. Photo: Taste! installation shot

Sea of Paperwork

12 - 25 August, 2022
Sea of Paperwork is a display of art from workshops which invited young people to explore themes relating to migration, asylum and integration.  It presents the creative processes behind a printed publication of the same name, and offers an insight into the thoughts and feelings of the participants. The display includes a series of original artworks created by the young people themselves, alongside a video of the illustration process for the final print. As part of the exhibition we welcome you to leave a comment, and to reflect on the importance of these young contributors' perspectives. The participatory workshops took place from 2018 to 2019. Previously exhibited at the CCA, the themes discussed within the project are more relevant than ever. Through this exhibition, we continue to create spaces for discussion to highlight the importance of welcoming people in our communities. 

Balcony Display: Stones Steeped in History

12 - 25 August, 2022
This display, found in GoMA's Balcony Gallery, tells the story of the building from before it was built in 1776 through its various uses and modifications up to its controversial opening as a gallery of contemporary and modern art in 1996. The display explains that the original building belonged to William Cunninghame of Lainshaw and that he was a millionaire merchant. We are explicit in detailing that his wealth trading American tobacco and Caribbean sugar relied on the exploitation of enslaved people on plantations. The information on display also gives the further context of how Glasgow’s Georgian New Town, in and around Cunninghame’s mansion, developed as a business quarter and details how this new city grew through wealth acquired through the transatlantic slave trade and selling addictive tobacco, sugar and alcohol.

Spinning Around: Glasgow's Remarkable Record Shops, 1980-1995

12 - 25 August, 2022
This display will transport music fans back to a golden era for the city’s record stores. Among the exhibition’s main attractions are: gold discs from The Bluebells and Simple Minds; a fan-made, record shop bags connected to some of Glasgow’s best-loved vinyl venues; rare club flyers, including the Volcano’s legendary ‘Partick Passport’; and a 1956 Lambretta LD 150 scooter bought by Alex Kapranos, lead singer of Franz Ferdinand, to toast his first record deal.

Treasured shoe added to Athenia display on 80th anniversary of the sinking

12 - 25 August, 2022
Eighty years ago the SS Athenia was outbound from Glasgow, Liverpool and Belfast to Montreal, Canada with over 1,000 passengers on board. On the day World War 2 was declared in September 1939 it was attacked and sunk, becoming the first maritime casualty of the war. 122 people lost their lives. The deliberate sinking of the SS Athenia by a German submarine changed American public opinion, which ultimately lead to the US offering Britain and France support during WW2.   Riverside has a display dedicated to the ship and tells the story of the sinking.  The ship was built in Glasgow in 1923 for the Anchor-Donaldson Line, which later became the Donaldson Atlantic Line.  She worked between the United Kingdom and the east coast of Canada until September 1939.   In 2019 Rosemary Cass Beggs, the last British survivor of the sinking, donated a very personal memento to Riverside. As a 3 year old Rosemary was put into a lifeboat by her parents. Her father couldn’t swim, and her mother insisted they stay together, but save their child. Rosemary has vivid memories of being barefoot in the lifeboat, before being transferred to a ship that travelled on to Canada. While on board the ship to Canada other passengers made her tiny canvas shoes to protect her feet. When she was reunited with her parents some weeks later Rosemary’s family kept one shoe and gave one to the lady who had looked after her.   The tiny treasured shoe is now on show in Riverside. Such personal objects help bring the stories we tell in our museums to life and we are very grateful to Rosemary for her kind gift.

Step inside Driver’s Cab from ‘Train of the Future’

12 - 25 August, 2022
Come to Riverside and step inside a life-size replica driver’s cab of the brand new Nova 2 train by FirstGroup TransPennine Express. The child-friendly interactive display is based on a new state-of-the-art electric locomotive, set to be introduced on routes between Scotland and Northern England in 2020.   Leo Goodwin, TransPennine Express Managing Director, explained; ‘To build this faster, greener, electric train, engineers first had to make detailed drawings of what it might look like and how it would run. Then they conducted many tests to see if their ideas worked. This life-size replica cab was made to test the driver’s experience, comfort and safety and to see how the train’s exterior would look in real life.’   Riverside is home to Glasgow’s world famous transport and technology collection, including some notable locomotives from the 1900s. Having the Nova 2 train cab on show, representing the future of rail transport, keeps our collection current. What’s more not many people actually get to sit in the driver’s cab of a train, so the fully accessible interactive is expected to be popular, especially with younger visitors to the museum. Older ones can explore the vastly different conditions train drivers enjoy today, when contrasted with their compatriots who travelled up and down the country more than one hundred years ago.   The new ‘TransPennine Express at Riverside’ display is enhanced by a 360 degree view of the cab and flythrough of the new train’s interior, some technical information, images and links to other locomotives on display at Riverside and held in the city’s collection. It is located on the ground floor of the main hall, below the Infinite Velodrome display. 

Dorothee Pullinger displays honours trailblazing automotive engineer

12 - 25 August, 2022
_Driving Force: Dorothée_ _Pullinger and the Galloway Car _celebrates the achievements of British engineering pioneer, business woman and racing driver Dorothée Pullinger. Dorothee co-founded the Women’s Engineering Society (WES) and we are delighted the new display opens in its centenary year.   The centrepiece is a rare Galloway motorcar built in 1924 at the Heathhall factory Pullinger managed, which was legendary for the large number of women engineers it employed. Pullinger led by example paving the way for women in engineering as well as in motor sport. She defied the conventions of the time by becoming a young engineer, but in 1920 she came up against the prevalent gender-bias of the time when she applied to join the Institution of Automobile Engineers and was turned down on the grounds that ‘the word “person” means a man and not a woman’.   Dorothée Pullinger was born in France in January 1894. Her father was the car designer Thomas Pullinger. The family moved to the UK and in 1910 she started work at Arrol-Johnston, a car manufacturer in Paisley, Scotland, where her father was a manager.   When World War One started Dorothée was in charge of female munitions workers at Barrow-in-Furness in Cumbria. While employed there she introduced a canteen system that provided meals for the workers and ended up being responsible for around 7,000 people. She was later awarded an MBE for her work during the war. After the war Dorothée returned to Scotland and to cars, resuming her engineering training. From there she became the manager of the Galloway Engineering Company, a subsidiary of Arrol-Johnston, at its factory near Kirkcudbright. In the early 1920s production of the Galloway motor car began. Dorothée Pullinger played a central role in its success.   Galloways were described by _Light Car and Cycle _magazine in 1921 as ‘built by ladies, for those of their own sex’. This was exactly what Dorothée had envisaged. Smaller and lighter than most cars of the time, it featured gears in the middle of the car rather than outside, the steering wheel was smaller with the seat raised and the dashboard lowered.   The 1920s was a difficult time for independent car makers, only 4,000 Galloways were made and the factory ceased production by the end of the decade. The Galloway car on show at Riverside Museum is believed to be one of only 15 that remain worldwide and one of only four in Scotland.   Dorothée also liked to drive and in 1924 she was ‘the first lady competitor’ to enter an annual race called the Scottish Six Days Trials. She won the silver cup. Also on show are two loaned objects from the Pullinger family; a small racing medal awarded to Dorothee in 1922 and her A5 sketchbook from 1908, featuring watercolours painted near their home in Dalry when she was 14. These are complemented by a thistle mascot that would have been on the bonnet of select cars, an engine badge, a Galloway catalogue, a cloche hat and a pair of 1920s shoes. Inside the car a specially-commissioned costume will be presented to reference the costume Dorothée wore when she competed in the 1924 Scottish Six Days Trials.   Three films help bring the story to life for visitors. The first, an interview with two young Scottish rally drivers, Erica Winning and Amy McCubbin, who describe what it is like to be female rally drivers today and compare their experience with Dorothée’s racing in the 1920s, explaining why she is such an inspiration. A second features a young engineer dressed in the Galloway factory uniform talking about the car and its key elements. The last film introduces two of Dorothee’s children speaking about their mother.   _Driving Force: Dorothée_ _Pullinger and the Galloway Car _is located on the ground floor of Riverside Museum by the car wall at the South entrance.

Coming into View: Eric Watt's photographs of Glasgow

12 - 25 August, 2022
Eric Watt's passion for amateur photography led him to spend his free time on the streets of Glasgow, taking images of the city and its people. This exhibition displays some of his most striking images showing Glasgow from the late 1950s to the 1990s. Many of the most engaging photos show children at play in the streets and parks, but Watt also documented the adult world in all its complexity. Work, leisure, faith and politics are recorded with affection and curiosity. What stands out most of all however is Glasgow itself and the way the city changed over time.

Striking Herstories

12 - 25 August, 2022
A brand-new trail at Europe’s first national football museum will shine a spotlight on the fascinating history of women’s football in Scotland. New artworks and text panels will bring to life the stories of iconic female footballers, including Ayrshire’s Rose Reilly, voted the world’s best female footballer in 1983, and Scotland's most prolific goal scorer, Julie Fleeting, who has over 100 goals to her name. The trail will also explore the adversity and discrimination Scottish women have faced over the centuries, and the highs and lows of playing the game. By showcasing the tenacity and talent of these trailblazing women, this vital new trail will provide inspiration for future female players of the beautiful game. The trail will launch on 1 June and be available thereafter. Please pre-book your slot online before visiting the museum. The price of the trail is included within a combo ticket for museum and stadium tour admission: £13 full price / £5 concessions / free for under 5s.

Artist Studio | Alice Dansey-Wright

12 - 25 August, 2022
Over the last 5 years Alice Dansey-Wright has been an associate artist working with Platform, looking at different approaches to working with our Taking Part groups, whilst exploring where fine art meets craft and design.  Artist Studio is a culmination of Alice's journey with the community at Platform, celebrating all aspects of work created together with young people and adults. The title, Artist Studio, comes from a project that Alice designed whilst working online with the groups, responding to the ongoing limitations and impact that Covid-19 had on our lives, exploring ideas and concepts of an artist studio, in particular, how one can be established at home. The exhibition is site-specific, with artworks located across the building where large scale paintings, a miniature studio and collaborative artworks will be displayed alongside a new text response to the exhibition by Rhona Warwick Paterson.

Going Green – The Drive for Energy Efficiency

12 - 25 August, 2022
Going Green – The Drive for Energy Efficiency considers James Watt’s pioneering spirit and his legacy in a modern-day context, where the desire to be increasingly energy efficient to combat climate change is ever-present.  The centrepiece is a Tesla Model S P85+, believed to be the first Tesla acquired by a public museum in Scotland. The pioneering car, gifted to the city by a private collector and enthusiast is a stunning and technologically important car, which represents a new dawn in electric vehicle development. One section of the new display Driving Out Emissions considers how revolutionary changes in transport and the development of more environmentally friendly vehicles can reduce emissions and assist in tackling climate change.    Boasting a raft of innovative features and impressive technology, the Tesla Model S can travel 242 miles on one charge, at a cost of around £9. It can reach 0-60mph in 4 seconds, be controlled from the owner’s smart phone and convert from a 5 to 7-seater family car. Alongside the Tesla is a rare Honda Insight Mk1 from 2000.  Donated by another enthusiast, it is one of only 239 Mk1s sold in the UK and was the first hybrid car to be acquired for the city’s renowned transport and travel collection.  Its inclusion in the display opens up a discussion on different power sources, from coal and quartz to wind and water and the ability to consume less of one by using more of another, as illustrated by the hybrid Honda which combines a conventional petrol engine with an electric motor. Going Green – The Drive for Energy Efficiency shows the concern for our world is universal, while highlighting that we can all make a positive difference to planet Earth. The display considers how we test air quality, monitor oceans and make personal statements about the environmental dangers our world faces. Going Green – The Drive for Energy Efficiency is sure to enthrall and engage visitors of all ages and will be an important talking piece for the younger generations. Sponsored by Aggreko. 'Aggreko are proud to be a part of the Museum’s significant project at a time when reducing carbon emissions is a priority for the clients we serve globally in meeting their specific power needs.” Robert Wells, Managing Director, Events Aggreko.

Clara Ursitti: Amik

12 - 25 August, 2022
This immersive new exhibition plays with ideas of exchange, bartering, trade and the histories of human, animal and botanic migration. Through film, scent and sculptures, Glasgow-based Canadian artist, Clara Ursitti explores the links between Scotland – specifically Glasgow’s former Royal Exchange building, now home to GoMA – and Canadian fur-trading legacies, particularly the Hudson’s Bay Company. The title for the exhibition, which translates as ‘beaver’ in Algonquin, a common language used by indigenous people in Canada, refers to the inspiration behind Ursitti’s work. With the beaver an iconic Canadian symbol relating to the British and French colonial eras, the artist regards the beaver pelt (skin) trade as crucial in defining the relationship of colonial settlers with the land and the natives they stole it from. In the exhibition, Ursitti uses sculptures, including found objects; scent; film recordings and sound work from residencies in Canada; and a whole tree ethically sourced and prepared by Glasgow-based environmental community GalGael. As part of her research, Ursitti collaborated with Katie Bruce, GoMA Producer/Curator, to study beaver histories in Scotland and the use of imported beaver pelts and other items contained within Glasgow Life Museums’ collection with connections to the history of the city’s Royal Exchange building. The Mitchell Library’s archives also helped the artist explore the Canadian fur trade’s ties to these shores. Clara Ursitti said: “It’s been fun and fascinating to work with Katie and access material, both in Glasgow Life Museums’ collection and in The Mitchell Library archives, in the development of this new work. The opportunity to reflect on where I was born and raised in relation to the linked history of Glasgow and the GoMA building has been invaluable. I am also very grateful to all the people I worked with in Canada, including those from the Temagami, Teme-Augama Anishnabai, Nipissing, North Bay and Algonquin-Mètis communities, and at GalGael here in Glasgow.”